Wednesday, September 28, 2022

Yoga and thyroid

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Yoga has several advantages for your general health and well-being. It can help you feel more energized, flexible, and less stressed. Although there is a link between stress and hypothyroidism, some yoga postures are considered to help thyroids that are either underactive or hyperactive regulate themselves. Yoga has been demonstrated to have a favorable effect on thyroid function in several studies. Keep in mind that these postures will not treat your thyroid problem. Yoga is regarded as a supplemental treatment. It’s not meant to take the place of any therapy or drugs you’re presently taking. Seek a certified yoga instructor who can assist you in creating a personalized yoga routine that will benefit your condition. Before starting any yoga program, consult your doctor. 

Thyroid-friendly yoga postures 

The majority of these stances are said to stimulate the throat. They’re supposed to increase thyroid circulation and energy flow and lengthen and strengthen the neck. Always remember to respect your body’s limitations. Take it easy on yourself and be kind to yourself. You may change or edit the positions to meet your own needs. You do not need to complete all of the poses in one sitting. You can practice a few poses throughout the day. 

 

  1. Supported shoulder stand

Shoulderstand is frequently recommended as the first position to address thyroid problems. It promotes blood flow to the glands in the upper body since it is inverted. The thyroid’s efficiency is thought to be improved due to this. Furthermore, it is believed that the way your chin is tucked into your chest in this position helps thyroid function. 

  • For further support, place a folded towel or blanket beneath your shoulders. 
  • Bring your shoulders to the blanket’s edge and place your head on the mat. 
  • Lie down flat on your back, arms beside your body, palms facing down. 
  • For support, press your arms and back against the floor. 
  • Raise your legs to 90 degrees on an inhale. 
  • Exhale slowly and raise your legs above your head. 
  • Your feet are capable of balancing in the air. 
  • To support your body, bring your hands to your lower back. 
  • With your pinky fingers on either side of your spine, keep your fingertips pointing up toward your hips. 
  • Raise your legs to the ceiling, straight up. 
  • If possible, maintain your shoulders, spine, and hips in one line. 
  • You can also hold your hips at an angle to your torso. 
  • Maintain a neutral neck posture by tucking your chin into your chest. 
  • Slowly lower your legs back over your head to exit the stance. 
  • Return your arms to the side of your body. 
  • Roll your spine down vertebrae by vertebrae and elevate your legs to 90 degrees on an inhalation. 
  • As you drop your legs to the floor, exhale. 

Be aware of your neck during this position, and stop practicing if you feel discomfort. It is recommended that you master this position under the guidance of a teacher who is well-versed in alignment. Keep in mind that this position is unsuitable for everyone because of the risk of injury. 

 

  1. Plow pose

Your thyroid is said to experience the same stimulation in plow posture as it does in shoulder stand. Plow posture could be more straightforward for you. 

  • Lie down flat on your back, arms beside your body, palms facing down. 
  • For support, press your arms and back against the floor. 
  • Raise your legs to 90 degrees on an inhale. 
  • Exhale slowly and raise your legs above your head. 
  • To support your body, bring your hands to your lower back. 
  • With your pinky fingers on either side of your spine, keep your fingertips pointing up toward your hips. 
  • If your feet don’t reach the floor, put a bolster or a block under them. 
  • If your feet do not touch the floor or the object, keep your hands on your hips. 
  • Bring your arms beside your body or interlace your fingers in front of your hips if it’s comfortable. Your feet must be supported. You can also extend your arms above your head. 
  • Bring your arms beside your body on the floor to release the posture. 
  • Lift your legs up and realign your spine along the floor with a slow inhalation. 
  • To drop your legs to the floor, exhale. 
  • If your feet don’t reach all the way to the floor, use cushions to support them. 

 

  1. Fish pose

The fish posture is an excellent complement to the shoulder stand. It’s easier to accomplish and can be completed on its own. 

  • Sit on your buttocks, legs stretched out in front of you. 
  • To position your hands behind your buttocks, go to one side at a time. 
  • Your palms should be facing down, and your fingers should be pointing toward your toes. 
  • Open your chest and draw your elbows into each other. 
  • Lean back on your forearms and elbows slowly. 
  • Expand your chest as much as possible and press onto your arms to keep it raised. 
  • If you’re at ease, lean back in your chair. 
  • Lift your head, let go of your hands, and lie down on your back to relax. 

 

  1. Cat-cow pose

It’s also said that the fluid motion of the cat-cow stance stimulates your thyroid. Blood flow to the neck chakra increases by drawing your chin into your chest and exposing it. Place your wrists precisely beneath your shoulders and your knees directly beneath your hips on all fours. This position is considered to improve spinal fluid circulation. This is said to enhance mental clarity and energy levels. As you proceed through this stance, keep your attention on your throat. 

  • Move your weight from side to side and forward and backward. 
  • Return to the middle and make sure all four points are equally weighted. 
  • Inhale and lower down the mat, allowing your belly to fill with air. 
  • Lengthen your neck and throat by looking up towards the ceiling. 
  • Draw your navel into your spine as you exhale. 
  • Lift and curve your spine toward the ceiling, tucking your chin towards your chest. 
  • Allow the movement to be guided by your breath. 
  • Continue moving in this manner for a few minutes. 
  • Allow yourself to relax by returning to the child’s pose for a few seconds. 

This position is considered to improve spinal fluid circulation. This is said to enhance mental clarity and energy levels. As you proceed through this stance, keep your attention on your throat. 

  1. Corpse pose

While this position may appear simple, lying in stillness for an extended time can be difficult. This position allows your body to be entirely open and supported; the corpse stance promotes total relaxation. It’s a fantastic way to relax and de-stress. It aids in the awareness of any tension you may be carrying in your body. Keep your focus on your breathing as it moves through your body. Pay attention to how your body feels. You have up to 25 minutes to practice. While lying in corpse posture, you can undertake a guided meditation or a yoga Nidra session. 

  • Lie flat on your back with your toes extended to the side and your feet approximately hip-width apart. 
  • Extend your arms outwards from your body, palms facing up. 
  • Make a straight line with your head, neck, and spine. 
  • Allow yourself to totally relax and release any tension in your body. 
  • Allow your breath to relax as you fall heavy on the floor. 
  • To support your lower back, you might want to bend your knees. 
  • Pillows can be placed beneath your knees for added support. 

Conclusion

Including any or all of these yoga positions in your regimen may improve thyroid function. On a daily level, do what feels best. Every day, try to perform at least a little yoga. These poses may lead you to new variants and postures that are most beneficial to you. Always pay attention to your body’s signals. Consider how each stance affects you, particularly your thyroid. 

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